Tag Archive for: linkedin

Facebook Style Content – Could It Choke LinkedIn?

24 Feb
February 24, 2016

Something unprofessional is happening with LinkedIn’s news feed.

While it’s always been terrible to navigate because it of the way it decides on Top Posts on a whim (try refreshing the page and watch it completely change), there is a trend that is on the rise which threatens the quality of the content and engagement.

I am talking about the increasing number of content pieces that are typically the domain of other networks, particularly Facebook style content.

Memes and pictures of lunch your friends share on their Instagram and Facebook? They’re now sitting right beside your 10 Habits of Highly Productive People.


Political posts that talk about how awesome Obama is doing, and that the republicans are wrong? Fitspo (apparently actually a word)? Questionably attributed celebrity quotes? All present and accounted for.
I spent ten minutes browsing my news feed each day over the last week and found at least 3 examples each day. All of these have the potential to choke LinkedIn’s already confusing and busy news feed and suck the life out of it.

I spent ten minutes browsing my news feed each day over the last week and found at least 3 examples each day. All of these have the potential to choke LinkedIn’s already confusing and busy news feed and suck the life out of it.

Where Is It Stemming From?

The main offenders are not always amongst your own LinkedIn connections. Given the way LinkedIn treats engagement with posts and presents them in your feed, whenever you begin liking or commenting on the content, it brings the full post to the attention of your network.

In a self-perpetuating cycle, even as we comment to tell people “this doesn’t belong here”, it increasingly appears “here”. It may be a third or even fourth-degree connection, but eventually, it makes it there.

So what’s wrong with it exactly?

It’s About The Nature of the Connection

LinkedIn connections are generally single faceted. Unlike Facebook, where occasional acquaintances to nearest and dearest fall under the very broad definition of “friend”, LinkedIn is by its definition a network of professionals.

Your connection is around what you do for a living – I have either done business with you, I’m interested in your expertise in your field, or I want to sell you an SEO solution (you know who you are…).

When you begin to introduce Facebook style content into the equation, your begin to make the relationship personal, which some business connections may not appreciate it. You can see it in the comments.

Define Your Social Tone Of Voice

If you are adding this type of content to LinkedIn, it’s important to consider before posting. Personal brand is of the utmost importance now, and the way in which you express these opinions online may lead to current and future business partners to take pause and reconsider your relationship.

Decide what you want to be known for online. Create your social tone of voice. I have a simple framework for deciding what and where to share:

How to decide what content to share on what social platform

LinkedIn makes it hard enough to find great content without having to wade through low-quality stuff. Use it to position yourself as a leader in your field, even if you’re not yet. Keep the memes on Facebook, wit on Twitter and lunch on Instagram.

How to Switch from Recent to Top Posts on LinkedInIncidentally, if you’re looking how to re-order from Top Posts to Recent posts, it these 3 little dots wedged in between your Publish a Post button and the first update in your feed. Obvious, right?

 

4 Tips To Get More From Buffer

11 Dec
December 11, 2014

About 90% of what I share on social channels is done using Buffer.

Buffer is one of the tools I called out as invaluable for managing social throughput, and in that post I offered up a few tips for using it. I wanted to dive into the tool a little deeper here.

I’m not what you would call a power user (I run on their basic tier), but I do try and squeeze a whole lot out of it in terms of function.

My primary use is as a curation tool to bring together other people’s content into my feed. Given the amount of content I read each day, I generally end up queuing about two days worth of social posts each time . As far as my own content goes, I use CoSchedule to develop and schedule my messaging, but the great part is that it integrates with Buffer as well. I’ll be publishing a post on CoSchedule soon.

Here are my 4 tips for doing more with Buffer.

Add more timesTwitter posting times

When you sign up, there will be a number of times already picked to share content.

I highly recommend changing these up, and creating a sharing schedule for each platform.

Firstly make sure that your timezone is right (under the Schedule tab) – nothing worse than setting times only to find yourself hours ahead or behind.

Understand the consumption habits of each platform – Twitter should be higher frequency of content as an example, given how fast a feed can move, whereas LinkedIn may be a 2 or 3 updates a day platform for you.

Add new times to each platform. My Twitter schedule (right) is based on 6 scheduled times a day, every 2 an a half hours, whereas LinkedIn is timed for 3 times a day, at the start and end of the workday, and lunchtime.

Change up your messages and add context

Depending on what device I am using, I use the Chrome and Safari extensions and the iOS app to add to my queue when I like a story. I will often add the item to the queue looking the same across all the platforms I want to share to.

After you’ve added your item to the queue, don’t forget about it. Every platform has its optimum posting format, so you need to make sure you go into the Buffer and edit what you have saved there to suit.

I will typically add a source’s Twitter handle at the point of adding to the queue and Buffer will automatically parse that to a full name for LinkedIn. It’s important to check this as you want to make sure the source is credited correctly.

Also important is adding hashtags for Twitter, G+ and even Facebook if you want (although they’ve never really taken off on Facebook). This will help visibility when they are published.

Understanding platforms like Google+ allow for a longer message (it only supports pages, not individual profiles), use this opportunity to write your thoughts ahead of the link

Add a picture

Image uploadImages increase engagement with social posts exponentially, so where available (which is everywhere), you should be using them.

Buffer offers the opportunity to add an specific image to the posts you share. This is particularly handy for Twitter posts where there is no preview of the content, unless the site you are sharing supports Twitter cards, but you can’t see this from queue dialogue, unlike Facebook, LinkedIn and G+ shares where the tool will parse a preview that you can see in the queuing dialogue.

Don’t just share something once

There is research to suggest that the multiple sharing of the same piece of content can do wonders for engagement. CoSchedule has a great schedule framework that demonstrates this.

Scheduling toolUse the New Scheduler tool (second tab) to pick the frequency by which you share your content and again, make sure you vary your message by platform.

Add additional schedule times to it if you want as well, per my first point.

If you want to keep a track of all the links you share using the tool, I also recommend checking out this post on using IFTTT to achieve that.

This kind of tool shouldn’t be the only thing you use to share content. As I said, I schedule about 90% of my output using this, with the remaining being direct shares from social platforms as I find information, and others being my own content that I post on the blog.

So how about you? Any ways you are using it that you’d like to share?

Do You Have A Personal Social Media Tone of Voice?

06 Jul
July 6, 2014

So if you read my tweets after about 7.30 on any given night, you’ll know I have an unhealthy appetite for reality TV. If you follow me for a 6 week period over June and July during State of Origin, you’ll know I tend to get very vocal about the game.

I’ll pass judgement on contestants or the other team, because that’s what any supporter would do, and there is a conversation to be part of.

Through all of it though, fired up passion is tempered and guided by what I have deemed my personal social media tone of voice guidelines.

Why is this kind of guideline important?

Those of us who manage corporate social media know the importance of a tone of voice guideline for a brand, one that embodies the spirit and matches the impression we want people to have of the work that gets done.

So why should your personal use be any different?

Every day, your digital footprint is getting bigger, and more of that content is being captured and indexed for all to see. If you’re trying to build a name for yourself, in any industry, this is something you need to be conscious of. Employers are increasingly using social to screen candidates – what will they find when they look at yours?

I’m not talking about a formal document, just a set of guiding principles. For a lot of the time, and I am sure for a lot of people, this is second nature.

My Tone of Voice “Rules of the Road”

There are always considerations before I post anything.

Is what I am about to post likely to offend, or create debate? If it’s the former, why do I need to post it? If it’s the latter, am I willing to engage in the conversation and back it up?

Are there any commercial arrangements with my employer that I need to be aware of? As I have spoken about before, disclaiming your opinions as independent of your employer can mean little, and shouldn’t be used to abdicate responsibility for your actions.

Two smaller considerations – with the exception of Facebook, nothing featuring kids or family. And I never swear on social – it adds nothing, and uses up characters…

Does this take away from your being genuine, being one of the key tenants of social? Absolutely not. You can still be genuine on social media without having to post everything that pops into your head.

It’s Still You

Regardless of what sort of guidelines you have for yourself, it still has to be you. Think about it as aspects of your personality.

I am very deliberate in how I use the channels I am across, and the narrow choice of channels I use makes it easy:

Facebook – A place to be myself. These people know me, they’re friends and family. Privacy settings mean I can disagree and debate, and talk about the things that they expect me to talk about, and perhaps be a little more free and easy than I would be on Twitter.

Twitter – Here, I share my thoughts on a variety of things, posts I find interesting, replies to people I agree or disagree with (guided by the above), and being part of the conversation about things taking place. There’s probably more consideration here about what I post than anywhere else.

LinkedIn – purely professional, here I post stories and links that are all business and represent points of view I think are worthy of sharing. It’s about giving those who follow my updates an insight into how I think business wise.

So that’s it – as I said, it’s not a formal, written policy, as a corporate TOV may be. But it’s no less important to your personal brand to be guided by some principles.

What about you? Do you consider how and what you post in line with beliefs or a tone of voice guideline?

This post was featured in my SlideShare – 6 Steps to Better Twitter Citizenship

PHOTO – Dwayne via Flickr