Tag Archive for: pocket

4 Discovery Sites for Content Curation

16 Jan
January 16, 2017

A couple of years ago I published my 4 step framework for curating quality content. My method really hasn’t really changed in that time, and every day I am discovering more and more amazing content being published. The first of the four steps was finding trusted sources to pull content from, so I wanted to share with you four sites that I’m currently using to discover amazing articles as part of my content curation strategy.

Pocket Explore

Screen shot of Pocket Discover

 

I’ve been using Pocket as one of my main tools for managing social throughput for years, and as they have amassed more and more links, their role as a discovery engine has increased.

The Explore function (currently in BETA) only seems to be available on desktop (different to the recommend function in the mobile app based on people you follow), but it is a search based discovery engine that will bring some great stories to the fore.

Another recent piece of functionality comes with their browser extension. When you add a site to your Pocket with the button, similar stories and recommendations will appear.

Post Planner

Screenshot of Post Planner

 

I was a bit late to Post Planner, despite having an account for years. I’ve never really delved into it until recently and realised the full potential of it.

Search on a key term, discover pages and accounts across Facebook and Twitter, and any articles based on keyword searches. Importantly, you can save these and build a feed of content to curate from.

It requires a little bit of refinement to your terms, but can pull in some great pieces to share in a number of formats, and allows you to schedule them.

Medium’s Reading Roulette

Screen shot of Medium Reading Roulette

 

As human beings we’re not singular in our interests, so it’s always important to be looking for stories to share that demonstrate that breadth of interest to move you beyond just your immediate area you are curating from.

Medium is both a powerful publishing platform for people, but they also do a great job of bringing stories to the for, through functions like their Reading Roulette (found in the main navigation).

These aren’t necessarily stories on your particular theme, but you’re sure to find something of interest.

BeBee

 

Screenshot of BeeBee

One network I am keeping an eye on for the moment and discovering some interesting content is BeBee, which is billing itself as a professional network built on affinity, or shared interest.

While members can curate links, there is also a publishing function, which is accompanied by a discover function. Here you can find a lot of original content on particular topics of interest.

While the user base is not huge yet, there is still some interesting content being created which will grow over time.

Would love to hear of any other sources people might find valuable for content curation.

 

 

5 Tools and Tips for Managing Social Throughput

12 May
May 12, 2014

I was asked the other day how I manage to consume so much information via social and find things that I think are worth sharing back out across platforms like Twitter and LinkedIn.

The flood of information now coming via the web and social is something we all manage in our own way, so here are a few tools and methods I use to manage the flow of information both ways.

TweetDeck

It has its shortcomings for many people (layout challenges and no mobile app to name two), but for me Tweetdeck is one of the best ways to manage the Twitter content. Managing a number of accounts as I do, it’s easy to have them all in one place and the tools I need to manage them available in browser and on desktop.

A few tips:

  • Get your columns in order. In general, I have two for each account I manage – stream and mentions. Then a column for related search terms, indirect mentions (those that don’t use the @) and misspellings. Then some of my lists, and then an additional one for any hashtags I want to track use of.
  • Move your columns around using the settings diagloue in each one. One of the shortcomings is the layout (you’ll need to scroll left and right to see all columns, rather than tile them), so bring columns to the left that are the most important, or the ones you need to be watching closely at a point in time.
  • While you can manage multiple accounts, make sure your default account is set to the one you use the most. It sounds obvious, but that way any actions you perform, particularly as you favourite and RT content, come from the right account. Nothing worse than a tweet going from the wrong account.

Twitter Favourites

While not necessarily a tool, the Favourite function on Twitter seems to mean different things to different people using the platform. Personally I prefer to use them as a basic bookmark that allows me to capture someone’s 140 characters in my fast moving feed.

Once I have had a chance to come back and read them, I will often unfavourite them and move them into somewhere else if I find them worthwhile enough – maybe add the article to Pocket, Share it out via Buffer or make some notes on it in Evernote.

Pocket

Everything I find interesting from a site / article perspective and think could be useful later goes into Pocket. I use the browser plugin on both Safari and Chrome to capture and categorise anything I find.

One pitfall if not used to its full potential is that it’s very easy to clip and forget content, and before you know it, you have thousands of articles with no idea of why you captured them in the first place. So:

  • Make time regularly to clear out / tidy up your Pocket. I do it twice a week.
  • Use the tag function, and be consistent with the tags you use.
  • Set it up on your phone also. It takes some fiddling on an iPhone to get it done, but the amount of content I find while mobile browsing makes it worthwhile.

Evernote

Evernote has become something of an indispensable tool for me.

I use it across both desktop, web and mobile (depending on the situation) to capture pretty much everything – meeting notes, ideas, photos of things I think will be interesting to share or write about, blog thought starters, or article snapshots that I want to mark up with my own thoughts.

There’s plenty already written about this amazing tool, so here’s three tips to make it easy:

  • Make sure you use the notebooks – you can spend forever trawling your Random Notes, make it easy on your self.
  • Use tags to make it easy to search and group notes
  • Go Premium. I’ve been using it for years, and the additional features come in very handy when you reach a mass of content.

Buffer

Once I have found and captured interesting content via any of the above, Buffer has become an output tool I use pretty regularly. I’ve always been on the fence about scheduling of content (and if I was honest probably erring on the side of “don’t”), but Buffer has made it very easy to do, and with a greater degree of flexibility than most. There’s nothing more annoying to have a Twitter feed flooded with a dozen updates from the same person, wallpapering your feed. Buffer helps avoid that occurring when you share.

There are also decent anaytics attached to it to measure the performance of what you share.

A few tips for using Buffer:

  • Work on the times to share. Buffer will pick times by default, and will schedule your content accordingly. Experiment with adjusting these times to see what if any impact they can have.
  • Don’t add time sensitive content to your Buffer. For example, if I wanted to share an update about Twitter’s share price, adding it to my Buffer would put it in  queue and potentially make it irrelevant by the time it publishes. Try using the Share Now function within and only buffer evergreen content.
  • Make sure you also move your messaging around once you’ve buffered it. I have at times found that a number of updates I have queued up one after another are similar in tone / topic. Drag and drop them to mix it up.

These aren’t the only tools I use, but form the most common ways I consume the flood of information out there.

So what about you? Any tools you use to manage the flow of information?

PHOTO – Iain Browne